The Humanist Association of Toronto provides a focus of activities and discussion for Humanists in the Toronto area. Please note: HAT events are open to the public, and views expressed do not necessarily represent the official views of the Humanist Association of Toronto. For all public statements, educational events, media enquiries, please contact the webeditor, who will forward your enquiry to our Spokesperson.
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The Humanist Forum meets Saturday morning 11am-1pm
The Monthly Meeting the 2nd or 3rd Saturday at 1:30pm (TBD)
The Steering Committee meets 1st Wednesday, 7pm
The Book Group meets monthly.
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Toronto is now honouring "artists, thinkers and scientists".

Plaques Mark Toronto's Heritage Heroes - Torontoist

See the EARLIER POSTon the British Humanist Association Humanist Heritage blue plaque program for comparison.

Toronto is now honouring  "artists, thinkers and scientists".

While London has blue plaques and New York City has bronze plaques and medallions, Paris has thousands of plaques  mounted throughout that city paying homage to citizens who died in its  defense during the Second World War. Cities the world over honour distinguished citizens and the places they lived — or, in the  case of Paris, where they died — with a variety of heritage programs. 

So how does Toronto recognize citizens who made a significant  contribution to the character of this city, and mark the location where  they domiciled? Until recently, it was through an ingenuously named heritage program known as Cabbagetown People. Since 2002, Cabbagetown People has honoured a slew of Heritage Heroes [PDF] (their terminology), commemorating the likes of author Morley Callaghan and world-famous magician  Doug Henning. Though well-intentioned, this heritage program lacked  scope, recognizing only those Heritage Heroes who had resided in the  Cabbagetown neighbourhood.

Like other metropolitan centres, Toronto was in need of a citywide  commemorative plaques program. Earlier this year, that's finally what it  got.In March, Mayor David Miller, along with Toronto’s first poet laureate Dennis Lee, and representatives from Heritage Toronto and the Toronto Legacy Project launched the Heritage Toronto Legacy Plaques Program. The citywide heritage program  recognizes Toronto’s artists, thinkers, and scientists by identifying  their homes or other significant locations in their lives.

NOTE:
Humanists may wish to RECOMMEND candidates or to recognize humanist luminaries in a similar program.  Ideas welcome.

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HAT meetings are free and open to members and the public. Call (416) 966-1361 for location information. ___________________________________________________
The Humanist Forum meets Saturday morning 11am-1pm.
The Monthly Meeting, is usually the second Saturday at 1:30pm; specifics should be found on this blog.
The Steering Committee meets the first Wednesday of each month, at 7pm.
The Book Group usually meets on the first Saturday afternoon of the month.